Breaking Up (With Your Employer) Is Hard, But It Doesn’t Have To Be

Breaking Up (With Your Employer) Is Hard, But It Doesn’t Have To Be

Employee Expertise

Our Experts | Karen Damm

karen damm

Sooner or later it happens: you have been extended an offer for a new job opportunity that will advance your career professionally and/or financially, and you find yourself having to resign from your current job. As excited as you are about the future, it can also be nerve-wracking and scary to tell your current employer that you are leaving.

Typically, as soon as you turn in your resignation you have changed the dynamics of your working relationship: you have now become equals instead of employer and employee. Let’s face it, you are now perceived as a deserter, a traitor, you have gone against the family. Forget your career objectives and trying to better yourself, they will just wonder how you could do this to them.

Regardless of your feelings, you want to keep your professionalism intact and your relationship with your current employer as positive as possible.

You never know when your paths will cross again, and at the end of the day all we have is our integrity and how we conduct ourselves.

In today’s world, it may sound old school to write a resignation letter, but it is the right thing to do. Texting or emailing is not going to cut it. You need to craft a letter that is short and to the point. This is not a time to brag about your new position, or drone on about your feelings and why you are leaving, and what your employer could have done better. Keep it simple.

There are literally thousands of examples of resignation letters online that you can pull from, but you want to always, always make sure that you are giving your current employer plenty of notice (rule of thumb is a minimum of two weeks).

In addition to providing a final date, you may also want to let them know that you would be happy to assist with your job transition. This could be sharing what you are currently working on, helping to train your successor, suggesting who might be best to take over your current workload, and overall making it as easy for them as possible to carry on while they look for your replacement. In some situations, your current employer might even ask for your assistance in interviewing your replacement.

Once you hand them the letter and the word is out, you may find yourself being walked to the door. Just remember that offering to help can go a long way in how you are remembered and keep your reputation intact.

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A Recruiter: More Than Your Last Resort

We get it. You’ve heard the rumors about staffing companies. You think a staffing company wouldn’t know your skills, qualifications, and values that you analyze during your job search. What could they possibly do that you can’t? You are a great candidate and you have a lot to offer to companies. Of course, you can find your own job.

An Open Letter From A Scientific Recruiter

An Open Letter From A Scientific Recruiter

Employee Expertise

Our Experts | Marc Kotora

MarcKotora
You are passionate about science and technology and so are we! But we need your help. Many workers eligible for science and technology jobs don’t use the terminology or detail needed in a resume for us to find them. Let me explain why we can’t find you, and what you can do to get found.

The hiring world is relying more and more on technology every day to assist hiring professionals efficiently and effectively locate and find the best talent. Many internal and external recruiters are managing upwards of 15-20 open requisitions at a time. If you leave out key points on your resume, it may not get flagged or moved through the screening process.

One of the challenges we are presented with daily is trying to find you and help connect you with great companies and career opportunities. There are many recruiters and talent acquisition professionals that are new to the industry or might not have a science degree. Help us connect the dots with the language and examples used on your resume.

If you are a Product Development Chemist, what product did you create? Were you the sole contributor, or work in a team environment? Did you see the idea or product from concept to completion? What success did you have? Did the product have a financial impact on the company’s profits (using to and from)? Use this language in your resume to highlight your accomplishments.

If you are a Quality Control Chemist, what process or methods did you test and validate? What types of instruments did you use? What types of chemicals or raw materials did you sample and test, or interact with? If you have used HPLC, list it! It can be included in the bottom of a resume in a skills section, or keep it within the position on your resume where the experience was obtained.

This will help recruiters, hiring managers and talent acquisition professionals find you easier when searching proactively through resumes for very specific experience or disciplines.

Resumes must have the right amount of content – use specific keywords that you would find in a job description, list your technical skills and include the industries you have worked in as well.

You can never assume that including your company’s name in a resume will bring your name up in a search for a specific job, so details about your position and experience are crucial.

Let’s work together in finding you and your colleagues’ great career opportunities! We might have the perfect opportunity, but we need to be able to find you and match your skill sets to the job.

Good Luck! I hope this information is helpful and you can implement for any current or upcoming job searches.

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We get it. You’ve heard the rumors about staffing companies. You think a staffing company wouldn’t know your skills, qualifications, and values that you analyze during your job search. What could they possibly do that you can’t? You are a great candidate and you have a lot to offer to companies. Of course, you can find your own job.

This One Thing Will Instantly Differentiate You From Other Job Applicants

This One Thing Will Instantly Differentiate You From Other Job Applicants

Employee Expertise

Karen Damm, Recruitment Advisor, Alliance Scientific Solutions

Karen Damm, Recruitment Advisor, Alliance Scientific Solutions

Our Experts | Karen Damm

You just hit the send key and your resume is on its way toward your next career opportunity, you’re sure to get an immediate callback, right? The hope is that the employer will read between the lines to see you are a perfect fit. But ultimately, it’s still just a resume and you’re not speaking directly to the position.

In today’s competitive job market, you really need to stand out from the thundering herd of people applying for the same positions.

Don’t ever assume that the person on the other end can read between the lines and determine that you are fit.

With that in mind here is one tip that is sure to set you apart from the rest.  It’s something I call a “profile questionnaire.” Here’s what you do:

Read through the job description and pull out all of the keywords and major requirements

Open up a new word document and take a moment to address the “when, why and how” of each requirement. Give as many details as you can about how you’re a great fit for the position.

Attach it to your resume, like a cover letter or any other supporting documents, and send it on over.

It may sound daunting at first, but if you are niched in your space you will see that most employers in your industry look for the same qualifications, which means with minimal tweaking you will be able to use this tool over and over.

This truly is your opportunity to brag about your expertise. It’s better to define everything you’ve done in detail because the one thing you leave out could be what’s most important for the position. Ignoring that one specific skill or experience could cost you the job, and especially when you’re applying to a large company that’s searching through thousands of resumes for specific keywords.

Do this, and you’ve elevated yourself to the next level. You’ve tailored your experience and made it completely relatable to the job you’re hoping to land.

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Regulatory demands require the right people to ensure compliance

Regulatory demands require the right people to ensure compliance

Employee Expertise

Our Experts | Marc Kotora
Marc Kotora, Brand Leader, Alliance Scientific Solutions

Marc Kotora, Brand Leader, Alliance Scientific Solutions

Originally published by Smart Business.

In the U.S., there’s been a greater demand for food, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and medical devices that are either produced abroad or are made with materials acquired outside the country. With that increase in production, hiring people with the right kind of experience to deal with global regulatory compliance has been dramatically affected as well.

“The manufacturing environment has become increasingly complex because companies across the globe are connected within the supply chain,” says Marc Kotora, managing director at Alliance Scientific Solutions.

“The skill and specialization needed to be successful in this expansive marketplace hinges entirely on a company’s workforce. It’s imperative that businesses find ways to bring the best talent into their companies to remain competitive,” he says.

Smart Business spoke with Kotora about the competitive landscape and how to find the right people for the job.

Where are the greater needs in terms of position and industry?

Global production of products regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has quadrupled during the past decade. The ingredients and components originate from more than 150 countries, and involve 130,000 importers at 300,000 foreign facilities. This has triggered an increase in demand for people with a working science background and experience dealing with regulatory agencies who can help align businesses with their strategic partners, suppliers and vendors across the globe. These areas of focus include quality control, quality assurance, regulatory affairs, compliance, documentation and engineering departments.

Who can fill these positions?

An academic background in biology, chemistry and engineering is helpful, but it’s better that candidates have on-the-job experience. The most desirable candidates have had interactions directly or indirectly with the FDA or other global regulatory agencies such as the European Medicines Agency or Canadian Medical Devices Regulations.

How are employers finding the right talent?

Many companies are proactive in seeking this type of talent. They will post positions and assemble internal talent acquisition teams that are led by internal hiring managers. They work with an internal applicant tracking system to find, vet and hire the right talent for their needs. Keeping the hiring process in-house, however, might mean missing out on the highest-level talent.

The best candidates are typically employed. Certainly, there are talented people without a permanent job, but many of the best-fit candidates are currently working. Professional service firms can access candidates through their deep referral network and offer them new opportunities.

What can companies do to ensure they have the talent necessary to compete?

At a minimum, companies working in the affected fields will need experienced internal talent acquisition teams or third-party sourcing partners, a strong employee retention strategy, robust training programs, and branding strategies that promote awareness in the market place to attract the best talent to support hiring initiatives.

The specific knowledge and experience necessary to fill these positions has many companies reaching out to professional service firms to supply the most qualified candidates. Recruitment process outsourcing allows companies to tap into the deep industry knowledge of the professional service firms that are able to thoroughly vet candidates. An outsourced firm has the industry knowledge to find the types of candidates that best fit the position by tapping into its vast referral network of industry leaders. Firms working in the talent acquisition field have a great deal of experience recruiting specific types of candidates and are good at recognizing the most applicable skill sets.

The specialization and experience needed to fill these high-demand positions means there are few highly qualified candidates available. Companies will be at war with each other to acquire the best talent. Businesses that don’t have the internal resources should consider utilizing recruitment process outsourcing or professional services firms to keep the pipeline of candidates full.

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We get it. You’ve heard the rumors about staffing companies. You think a staffing company wouldn’t know your skills, qualifications, and values that you analyze during your job search. What could they possibly do that you can’t? You are a great candidate and you have a lot to offer to companies. Of course, you can find your own job.